Jesurgislac’s Journal

October 18, 2008

“I should have a choice about this”

Transcript below the fold.

From the ad: “I was raped. And then I got pregnant. Sarah Palin believes the government should be able to force me to carry the pregnancy to term. Sarah Palin believes that the government should make that choice. Not me. Governor Palin, I didn’t have a choice about being raped. But I should have a choice about this.” (via)

Sarah Palin: “Palin said she would support abortion only if the mother’s life was in danger. When it came to her daughter, she said, ‘I would choose life.’”

But not life for her daughter. At the time Palin said that she wanted her daughter to be forced to bear a rapist’s child, her oldest daughter was 14.

Moreover, Alaska’s rape rate was an abysmal 2.2 times above the national average and 25 percent of all rapes resulted in unwanted pregnancies. But Palin’s position was palatable within the state’s largely Republican political circles. (HuffPo)

During the four years Palin was mayor of Wasilla:

While the Alaska State Troopers and most municipal police agencies have covered the cost of exams, which cost between $300 to $1,200 apiece, the Wasilla police department does charge the victims of sexual assault for the tests. Wasilla Police Chief Charlie Fannon does not agree with the new legislation, saying the law will require the city and communities to come up with more funds to cover the costs of the forensic exams.

That’s Sarah Palin. If the Republicans who find her policies “palatable” manage to rig the 2008 election and get McCain and Palin into the White House, that’s the woman who will be President if John McCain doesn’t manage to survive the next four years.

5 Comments »

  1. wow.

    even worse than forcing someone who was raped to carry her rapist’s child to term is the fact that she also opposes providing emergency contraception to rape victims which doesn’t just force them to carry a pregnancy to term, it can actually force these women and girls to get pregnant in order to carry a preventable pregnancy to term.

    Comment by ol cranky — October 19, 2008 @ 6:47 pm | Reply

  2. I’m sorry you were raped. I know exactly how that feels.

    However, since Sarah Palin has never said she would legislate from her beliefs, nor has she ever done so, you’re playing a little fear-based politicking yourself here, now, aren’t you? Personally, I’d never use my personal experience to badger other women into choosing the way I would. It skates another ethical line as far as I’m concerned. Choice is a concept that applies to much more than abortion.

    Comment by Anna Belle — October 20, 2008 @ 5:03 pm | Reply

  3. I’m sorry you were raped. I know exactly how that feels.

    I’m sorry you were raped: I wasn’t. I was quoting from the ad, which I’d thought I’d made clear. If you can tell me how I can make it more clear, I’d appreciate that.

    However, since Sarah Palin has never said she would legislate from her beliefs

    That’s a bit of a stretch, isn’t it? Certainly Sarah Palin has done what she could to impose her own beliefs on others – from firing the Wasilla librarian because she wouldn’t agree to ban books, onwards. Neither as Mayor nor as Governor did she have power to legislate. What Palin had the power to do, she did.

    Personally, I’d never use my personal experience to badger other women into choosing the way I would. It skates another ethical line as far as I’m concerned. Choice is a concept that applies to much more than abortion.

    I completely agree. But Sarah Palin doesn’t agree with you.

    Comment by jesurgislac — October 20, 2008 @ 7:52 pm | Reply

  4. Anna Bell: Palin did use her power as the Mayor to cancell the budget money for rape kits. She did try to fire a librarian who disagreed with her on the subject of banning books.

    She did fire a state official who told her he wasn’t going to do something he felt to be illegal.

    So, while as the executive, she didn’t legislate (which isn’t the job of an executive), she did do as much as she could to turn her beliefs into policy.

    And she’s against choice. She’s against the choice for a rape victitm to avoid pregnancy, and she’s against choice if one should get pregnant.

    Why, given her track record, should I believe she’d not take advantage of what power she might have to repeat the choices of behavior she’s made in the past? Why can’t I look at her track record and say… “I don’t like what she did, and I choose not to give her the chance to make those choices again; on a grander scale.”

    If I’m not supposed to judge her on her actions, her policies and her stated positions… what am I supposed to base the choice on? Her looks? Her family? Her party?

    The first two arent’ relevant, and the third doesn’t (given their track record in the past 12 years) recommend itself to me either.

    I’ll be damned if I am going to be told she’s the best VP pick on any ticket, becaus of her experience, and then accept the argument that the experience isn’t a valid measure of her candidacy. Either she’s is experienced (in which case her track record counts), or she isn’t, and I can decide how I feel about having someone with no experience chosen to be the number two of a guy who’s likely to die in office.

    Either way, in that decision, she comes up short.

    Comment by Terry Karney — October 20, 2008 @ 9:38 pm | Reply

  5. Anna Belle: However, since Sarah Palin has never said she would legislate from her beliefs, nor has she ever done so, you’re playing a little fear-based politicking yourself here, now, aren’t you?

    Well, Sarah Palin has now said directly that she will “legislate from her beliefs” – well, as Terry notes, the executive branch can’t legislate, but that she’ll use her authority/power to support legislation such as the Constitutional amendment against equal marriage:

    Brody: On Constitutional marriage amendment , are, are you for something like that?

    Palin: I am, in my own, state, I have voted along with the vast majority of Alaskans who had the opportunity to vote to amend our Constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman. I wish on a federal level that that’s where we would go because I don’t support gay marriage. I’m not going to be out there judging individuals, sitting in a seat of judgment telling what they can and can’t do, should and should not do, but I certainly can express my own opinion here and take actions that I believe would be best for traditional marriage and that’s casting my votes and speaking up for traditional marriage that, that instrument that it’s the foundation of our society is that strong family and that’s based on that traditional definition of marriage, so I do support that.

    She’s incoherent as she ever is when not reading from a script, but she’s absolutely clear that she’s going to “take actions” to prevent same-sex couples from ever being able to be married.

    Comment by jesurgislac — October 21, 2008 @ 9:16 am | Reply


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